Scrappy 9-Patch and Snowball Quilt

Thursday, November 7, 2019

I promised I would show you what I made with the leftovers from my Bow Tie Quilt...


Well, I actually made TWO quilts.  But today I am sharing just one of them (don't worry I'll share the second one soon).  The first quilt from the leftovers was a scrappy 9-Patch and Snowball quilt!  Two blocks, in my opinion, where you never can go wrong!


In fact, this combination of blocks creates a classic pattern you've probably seen before.


They make a fun secondary pattern together, too!  


This is a great pattern to help you use up scraps!


I used 4" (cut) squares for the 9-Patch squares and the bright Snowball corners.
The large, white Snowball squares were cut at 11". 


But really, with some simple math, you could adjust this pattern to work with any size squares!
I just so happened to have 4" squares left over from my Bow Tie quilt.


I mocked up this version in EQ7 to show you the entire layout.
I did a 5 x 7 block layout to keep the symmetry, but with that came a slightly long, skinny quilt.
Mine finished at 52" x 73".  Normally I think a good proportion is about a 12" - 15" difference.


If you aren't a fan of the long, skinny look, another option would be to make it square.  I personally am perfectly fine with square quilts, but I know some people aren't.  And since I was making this just for fun (and was planning on selling it), I decided to keep it rectangular.


I found a pink Riley Blake floral for the back and a turquoise gingham for the binding. 


I didn't show many pictures of this quilt on Instagram because unfortunately there was an issue with the long-arm quilting.  You probably can't tell from these photos since I tried to hide the parts that were really bad, although now I'm wishing I would've taken some pictures of those parts to show you!  But basically, I used a new-to-me long-arm quilting company and I think this was the first time they used this orange peel design and they had a hard time lining up the design.  There was a lot of overlapping and such.  I felt bad (and I know they felt really bad) but these things happen sometimes.  Fortunately, they made it right in the end, which I appreciated.  I ended up selling the quilt (with a huge discount) to a photographer wanting to use it as a photo prop.  And obviously, I told her ahead of time what the situation was.


Overall, I still think this quilt turned out cute.  After washing and drying it, the owner may not notice all the imperfections in the quilting.  I love the fabrics and the design, and orange peel quilting is always a favorite of mine!  Maybe I'll make another one someday.  I definitely have lots of squares that need to be put to good use. 

Have you ever had a long-arm quilting "mishap"?
I am thinking about putting together a blog post with some advice to long-arm quilters from their customers.  Over the 20 years that I've been quilting, I've had hundreds of quilts long-arm quilted and I've learned a lot.  I've dealt with a few mishaps along the way and have definitely seen a difference in how different long-armers handle them.  Some of them handle it wonderfully and some of them don't.  I wish they all had a policy in place for how they will handle mistakes, because they are bound to happen once in a while.  Please share your "mishap" stories or the advice you wish you could give your long-arm quilter below.

Thanks for stopping by!

9 comments:

  1. I took my very first pieced quilt (a wedding gift for my son) years ago to a well known local fabric shop to have it quilted. I told them precisely what I wanted. The quilter obviously had other ideas. When I picked it up I was flabbergasted. I took it home and couldn't stop crying over it. Yes, it was just a quilt, but... My husband took it back to the shop and told them it was not acceptable. The quilter took the quilt, unpicked everything that she had decided to add, and then did what I had requested in the first place. All's well that ends well, but I never went back to that shop. My advice to a long arm quilter would be to do as your client asks. If the outcome isn't perfect it's on the client's shoulders, not yours.

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  2. I'm waiting for a quilt to come back from the long-armer for the second time right now. There were multiple places where there were skipped stitches. After reading up on it, I think the t-shirt decals probably dulled and clogged the needle which allowed it to happen. It would have been great if it was caught before I got it back, but as soon as I contacted them asking for ideas on how I should fix it they immediately told me they'd like it back so they can fix it. Couldn't have been nicer or more apologetic or more insistent they would make it right. Which is what we hope for when things happen. And happen they do.

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    1. It sounds like both of you handled it nicely! It's too bad it happened but I'm glad they fixed it for you!

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  3. I once had a quilt come back with the backing upside down. I was devastated! The longarm quilter actually said she thought that’s what I wanted because when it’s on a bed and you turn it down (something I personally never do) then the back would be “right side up”. Lesson learned: always label which way your top is, on the quilt top AND on the backing.

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  4. As a new longarmer just starting to quilt for others I would love to read about the cautionary tales so I do not make the same mistakes in customer service !

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    1. I think that's great you feel that way! Hoping to get a post out next week probably!

      Thanks for stopping by!
      Amber

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  5. I really just love the colors in your quilt and the pattern is beautiful. It inspires me to make one from some lovely scraps. Thanks for sharing your amazing quilt!

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    1. Thank you! Scrappy quilts are my fave :)

      Have a great day!
      Amber

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  6. Ugh... My best friend quilts for me and she broke her collarbone, so I had to send my quilt out. One of the top online shops had a discount and I shipped my quilt to them. When it was shipped back to me, I was shocked. The quilter had ripped the back of it, then tried to repair it by sewing a piece of fabric over the tear. I was horried because this quilt was going to be sold! I contacted the company and the owner told me that his wife was the longarmer. He was very gracious, asking me what it would have sold for, and he sent me the full price.

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I ♥ to hear from you so please feel free to leave a comment. I read each one and try to respond as often as I can. Thanks so much for stopping by! ~Amber